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  2. Nov 8, 2021

Patients in MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital’s Food Rx Program Learn About Benefits of a Plant-Based Diet for Diabetes at Morgan State University

Robina Barlow
Robina Barlow, Food for Life Instructor

Patients in MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital’s Food Rx program learned about the benefits of a plant-based diet for fighting type 2 diabetes and other chronic health conditions on Monday, Nov. 8, at Morgan State University in Baltimore.

Robina Barlow, an instructor with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine’s Food for Life program taught “Introduction to How Food Fight Diabetes.”

MedStar’s Food Rx program is an evidence-based medically tailored food and nutritional support program for patients with multiple complex chronic conditions, and/or food insecurity, who are referred through the Collaborative Care Program at Good Samaritan Hospital.

As part of the program on Nov. 8, Ms. Barlow taught at Morgan State University’s nutrition kitchen, where patients learned about plant-based nutrition and basic cooking skills. Morgan State University dietetic students supported the activity with a healthy diet presentation as part of their community education class.

“When I noticed my blood pressure and cholesterol levels beginning to rise, I started a plant-based diet and had quick success in getting and keeping them in a healthy range,” says Robina Barlow, who regularly teaches Food for Life classes in Montgomery County, Md. “I look forward to showing patients in MedStar Health’s Food Rx program how they too might improve their health with a plant-based diet.”

The Physicians Committee conducts clinical research on plant-based diet and diabetes. A recent review paper published by doctors and dietitians with the Physicians Committee found that eating patterns that emphasize fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains and remove animal products improve risk factors for diabetes, including blood sugar, cholesterol, weight, blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease.

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