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The Physicians Committee




Dinner Recipes

Quinoa Tacos

Makes 12 tacos (12 servings)

Quinoa is used as a grain, but is actually a seed native to South America. It is high in protein, and can be used as a substitute for rice.

4 cups water
5 cups chopped romaine lettuce
3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
2 cups Low-Fat Guacamole
12 flour tortillas
2 garlic cloves, minced or pressed
3 cups cooked black beans
2 cups dry quinoa
1/4 teaspoon salt, to taste
1 cup salsa such as Colorful Corn Salsa

Boil water with salt. Add quinoa. Reduce to medium-low and cook for 20 minutes. Set aside.

Cook beans and garlic in a shallow pan on medium-low heat for 5 minutes.

Fill tortillas with quinoa, beans, guacamole, and cilantro. Top with lettuce and salsa.

Keep leftover taco ingredients in separate covered dishes and refrigerate. Quinoa and beans will stay fresh for about three days. Wrap tortillas to prevent them from drying and they will stay fresh for about seven to ten days in the refrigerator. Chopped romaine and cilantro are best when used within one to two days. Follow storage recommendations for Low-Fat Guacamole and Colorful Corn Salsa.

Per serving:
Calories: 358
Fat: 7.5 g
Saturated Fat: 1.4 g
Calories from Fat: 18.8%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 13 g
Carbohydrates: 61.1 g
Sugar: 4.5 g
Fiber: 10 g
Sodium: 1188 mg
Calcium: 133 mg
Iron: 5.9 mg
Vitamin C: 8.6 mg
Beta Carotene: 791 mcg
Vitamin E: 1.3 mg

Source: The Survivor’s Handbook: Eating Right for Cancer Survival by Neal D. Barnard, M.D. and Jennifer Reilly, R.D.

Buckwheat Pasta with Seitan

Makes 6 servings

This recipe contains soba, a Japanese buckwheat pasta. Buckwheat is a great source of rutin, a type of bioflavonoid that has an amazing capacity to fight free radicals, which are responsible for many cancers. Soba is available in the Asian food section of many supermarkets and health food stores, as well as in Asian markets. Whole-wheat angel hair pasta or spaghetti can be used as an alternative to the soba.

12 ounces dry soba noodles
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder, or 1 teaspoon chopped garlic
2 teaspoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons flour
8 ounces seitan, sliced
1 yellow bell pepper, seeded and sliced
1 red bell pepper, seeded and sliced
3 cups sliced fresh mushrooms
1 3/4 cups vegetable broth or water
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

Bring water to boil in a large pot. Add soba noodles and salt and boil for about 8 minutes until al dente (cooked enough to be firm and chewy, but not mushy). Drain noodles and rinse with cold water to prevent them from sticking.

Sauté onion in a large skillet with 1/4 cup vegetable broth or water until transparent, and then add mushrooms and bell peppers. Cover and continue cooking until mushrooms are brown and bell peppers are soft, and then stir in seitan. Add more vegetable broth or water as needed if pan becomes dry.

Whisk flour and remaining 1 1/2 cups broth or water together until smooth. Add this mixture to the skillet along with soy sauce, garlic, and black pepper. Cook, uncovered, over medium-low heat until thickened.

Pour seitan mixture over noodles, top with parsley, and serve.

Freshly boiled soba noodles are best when eaten immediately. Stored in a covered container in the refrigerator, leftover Buckwheat Pasta with Seitan will keep for 2 to 3 days.

Tip: Most brands of soba noodles contain sodium. Try to find a brand that is lower in sodium and consider omitting salt from cooking water.

Per serving:
Calories: 263
Fat: 1.3 g
Saturated Fat: 0.2 g
Calories from Fat: 4.4%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 17.6 g
Carbohydrates: 49.5 g
Sugar: 4.9 g
Fiber: 5.6 g
Sodium: 796 mg
Calcium: 53 mg
Iron: 3.1 mg
Vitamin C: 67 mg
Beta Carotene: 751 mcg
Vitamin E: 0.9 mg

Source: The Survivor’s Handbook: Eating Right for Cancer Survival by Neal D. Barnard, M.D. and Jennifer Reilly, R.D.

Black-Eyed Peas with Sweet Potatoes and Greens

Makes 4 servings

A wonderful combination of flavors! Serve with brown rice or fat-free cornbread, with hot sauce on the side.

1 10-ounce package frozen kale, chard, or collard greens
4 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
2 10-ounce packages frozen black-eyed peas, thawed and drained
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 cups cooked sweet potato or yam, or 1 18-ounce can vacuum-packed unsweetened sweet potatoes, drained, rinsed, and chopped
few dashes liquid smoke

Thaw greens in the microwave or a bowl of boiling water. Chop and combine with broth, black-eyed peas, garlic, sweet potatoes, and liquid smoke in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring often, then reduce heat and simmer for 20 to 30 minutes.

Per serving (1/4 of recipe):
Calories: 298
Fat: 1.5 g
Saturated Fat: 0.3 g
Calories from Fat: 4.4%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 16 g
Carbohydrates: 58.2 g
Sugar: 10.4 g
Fiber: 13.3 g
Sodium: 304 mg
Calcium: 156 mg
Iron: 4.6 mg
Vitamin C: 32.8 mg
Beta Carotene: 14605 mcg
Vitamin E: 2.1 mg

Source: Dr. Neal Barnard’s Program for Reversing Diabetes: The Scientifically Proven System for Reversing Diabetes Without Drugs by Neal D. Barnard, M.D.; recipe by Bryanna Clark Grogan

Broccoli Burritos

Makes 6 burritos

You'll love broccoli, the powerful protector, rolled in a flour tortilla with a tangy garbanzo spread. Roasted red peppers are sold in supermarkets, usually near the pickles. Sesame seed butter, also called tahini ("ta-hee-nee"), is sold in natural food stores, ethnic markets, and many supermarkets. Look for it near the peanut butter or in the ethnic food section.

2 - 3 broccoli stalks
1 15-ounce can garbanzo beans
1/2 cup roasted red peppers
2 tablespoons tahini
3 tablespoons lemon juice
6 flour tortillas
6 tablespoons salsa, or more to taste

Cut or break broccoli into florets. Peel stalks and cut into 1/2-inch rounds. Steam over boiling water until just barely tender, about 5 minutes.

Drain garbanzo beans and place in a food processor with peppers, tahini, and lemon juice. Process until completely smooth, about 2 minutes. Spread about 1/4 cup of the garbanzo mixture on a tortilla and place in a large heated skillet. Heat until tortilla is warm and soft, about 2 minutes. Arrange a line of cooked broccoli down the center, then sprinkle with salsa. Roll tortilla around filling. Repeat with remaining tortillas.

Per burrito:
Calories: 284
Fat: 7.8 g
Saturated Fat: 1.4 g
Calories from Fat: 24.8%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 10.8 g
Carbohydrates: 44.7 g
Sugar: 3.7 g
Fiber: 7 g
Sodium: 490 mg
Calcium: 135 mg
Iron: 3.9 mg
Vitamin C: 68 mg
Beta Carotene: 938 mcg
Vitamin E: 2 mg

Source: Healthy Eating for Life to Prevent and Treat Cancer by Vesanto Melina, M.S., R.D.; recipe by Jennifer Raymond, M.S., R.D.

Lentil Barley Stew

Makes 6 1-cup servings

This hearty one-step stew makes a complete meal when it is served with a crisp green salad.

1/2 cup dry lentils, rinsed
1/4 cup dry hulled or pearl barley
4 cups Vegetable Broth (see recipe) or water
1 onion, chopped
1 garlic clove, pressed or minced
1 carrot, diced
1 celery stalk, sliced
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 - 1 teaspoon salt

Place all ingredients except salt into a large pot and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until lentils and barley are tender, about 1 hour. Add salt to taste.

Per 1-cup serving:
Calories: 146
Fat: 1.1 g
Saturated Fat: 0.1 g
Calories from Fat: 6.6%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 7.8 g
Carbohydrates: 27.8 g
Sugar: 2.1 g
Fiber: 6.7 g
Sodium: 352 mg
Calcium: 46 mg
Iron: 2.9 mg
Vitamin C: 5 mg
Beta Carotene: 1291 mcg
Vitamin E: 0.4 mg

Source: Healthy Eating for Life for Children by Amy Lanou, Ph.D.; recipe by Jennifer Raymond, M.S., R.D.

Black Bean Chili

Makes 6 to 8 servings

This chili can be cooked on the stovetop or in a slow cooker. Serve with Brown Rice or Spicy Bulgur Pilaf and a green salad.

2 cups dry black beans
1 bunch fresh cilantro, chopped (optional)
1 tablespoon cumin seeds
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 large onion, chopped
1 green bell pepper, seeded and diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 1/2 cups chopped tomatoes
1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1/4 cup chopped green onions

Wash beans and place in a large pan or bowl with 4 to 6 cups water. Soak overnight. Pour off soaking water and place in a pot with 6 cups fresh water. Add cilantro, if using. Bring to a simmer and cook until beans are tender, about 2 hours.

In a small, dry skillet, toast cumin, oregano, paprika, and cayenne until fragrant. Be careful not to inhale the fumes; cayenne can be very irritating.

In a large skillet, braise onion in 1/2 cup water for 2 minutes. Stir in bell pepper, garlic, cumin, oregano, paprika, and cayenne and cook until onion is soft. Add to cooked beans, along with tomatoes. Simmer 30 minutes or longer if time allows. Add salt to taste.

Serve in individual bowls topped with green onions.

Slow cooker instructions: Place washed, soaked beans in slow cooker with 6 cups boiling water, cilantro (if using), cumin, oregano, paprika, cayenne, onion, bell pepper, and garlic. Cover and cook on high until beans are completely tender, about 3 hours. Add tomato and salt to cooked beans and cook 1 hour more or longer.

Per serving (1/6 of recipe):
Calories: 237
Fat: 1.4 g
Saturated Fat: 0.3 g
Calories from Fat: 5.4%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 14.9 g
Carbohydrates: 43.6 g
Sugar: 6.6 g
Fiber: 14.9 g
Sodium: 206 mg
Calcium: 73 mg
Iron: 4.6 mg
Vitamin C: 25.1 mg
Beta Carotene: 359 mcg
Vitamin E: 0.4 mg

Source: Food for Life by Neal Barnard, M.D.; recipe by Jennifer Raymond, M.S., R.D.

Potato and Cauliflower Curry (Aloo Gobi)

Makes 6 servings

Turmeric and other Indian spices are getting more and more attention for their anti-cancer properties. Put them with known cancer-fighting vegetables and you’re in for real health food. For a hotter curry, increase the amount of cayenne.

1 onion, chopped or thinly sliced
2 tablespoons apple juice concentrate
1 15-ounce can chopped tomatoes, or 1 1/2 cups freshly chopped tomatoes
1/8 - 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
1/2 head cauliflower, broken or cut into bite-size florets (3–4 cups)
2 medium potatoes, chopped (peeling optional)
1/2 teaspoon salt

Heat 1/2 cup water in a large pot. Add onion and cook over medium-high heat for about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, until onion begins to soften. Reduce heat to medium. Add potatoes and cauliflower. Continue cooking, stirring often, for about 5 minutes. Add water, 1/4 cup at a time, if needed to prevent sticking.

Toast cumin seeds, turmeric, coriander, ginger, cinnamon, and cayenne in a dry skillet over medium heat for about 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Add spices to vegetables along with tomatoes, apple juice concentrate, and salt. Stir to mix, then cover and simmer for about 20 minutes until flavors are blended.

Stored in a covered container in the refrigerator, leftover Potato and Cauliflower Curry will keep for up to 3 days.

Variation: For a sweeter curry, add 1/2 cup golden raisins with tomatoes, apple juice concentrate, and salt.

Per serving:
Calories: 91
Fat: 0.4 g
Saturated Fat: 0.1 g
Calories from Fat: 4.1%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 2.7 g
Carbohydrates: 20.9 g
Sugar: 5.6 g
Fiber: 3.9 g
Sodium: 302 mg
Calcium: 53 mg
Iron: 2.3 mg
Vitamin C: 30 mg
Beta Carotene: 66 mcg
Vitamin E: 0.6 mg

Source: The Survivor’s Handbook: Eating Right for Cancer Survival by Neal D. Barnard, M.D. and Jennifer Reilly, R.D.

Grilled Polenta

Makes about 8 slices

Grilled polenta is delicious with a variety of foods. Try it with your favorite marinara sauce, cooked beans, Pan-Seared Portobello Mushrooms, or Braised Collards or Kale.

1/2 cup dry polenta (see glossary)
2 cups water
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed
1 vegetable oil spray

Combine polenta, water, salt, and rosemary in a saucepan and bring to a simmer. Cook, uncovered, over medium heat, stirring often, until polenta is very thick. Spread on a baking sheet in a 1/4-inch layer and refrigerate until completely cold, about 1 hour.

Preheat broiler. Cut chilled polenta into slices (about 2"×3") and arrange on a vegetable oil sprayed baking sheet. Place under broiler and cook until crusty, about 10 minutes. Turn and cook other side 10 minutes.

Per slice:
Calories: 32
Fat: 0.2 g
Saturated Fat: 0 g
Calories from Fat: 4.3%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 0.7 g
Carbohydrates: 6.7 g
Sugar: 0.1 g
Fiber: 0.4 g
Sodium: 149 mg
Calcium: 3 mg
Iron: 0.4 mg
Vitamin C: 0 mg
Beta Carotene: 10 mcg
Vitamin E: 0 mg

Source: Healthy Eating for Life for Women by Kristine Kieswer; recipe by Jennifer Raymond, M.S., R.D.

Lentil Burgers

Makes 8 3-inch burgers

1 small onion, chopped
1/2 cup dry short-grain brown rice
1/2 cup dry lentils
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups water
1 medium celery stalk, finely chopped
1 small carrot, finely chopped
2 teaspoons stone-ground mustard
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 vegetable oil spray

In a medium saucepan, combine onion, rice, lentils, salt, and water. Bring to a slow simmer, then cover and cook for about 50 minutes, or until rice and lentils are tender and all the water has been absorbed.

Add carrot, celery, mustard, and garlic powder to the hot lentil mixture. Stir to mix, then chill completely (you can make the patties while the mixture is still warm, but forming is much easier once it is chilled).

Form mixture into 3-inch patties. Lightly coat a large nonstick skillet with vegetable oil spray. Cook patties over medium heat for about 4 minutes per side, or until lightly browned.

Per burger:
Calories: 89
Fat: 0.6 g
Saturated Fat: 0.1 g
Calories from Fat: 5.5%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 4.3 g
Carbohydrates: 17.3 g
Sugar: 1 g
Fiber: 3.7 g
Sodium: 246 mg
Calcium: 17 mg
Iron: 1.4 mg
Vitamin C: 1.5 mg
Beta Carotene: 497 mcg
Vitamin E: 0.1 mg

Source: Foods That Fight Pain by Neal Barnard, M.D.; recipe by Jennifer Raymond, M.S., R.D.

Barbeque-Style Baked Tofu

Makes 6 1/4-inch slices

The firm texture and delicious flavor of baked tofu makes it a perfect snack, sandwich filling, or stir-fry ingredient. Begin with very firm tofu-it should spring back when lightly pressed. If it fails this test, begin by pressing it as directed below. For the marinade, you can use 1/2 cup of your own favorite barbeque sauce, or follow the recipe.

1 pound firm fresh tofu
1/4 cup ketchup
1/4 cup apple juice concentrate
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
1 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 scant pinch cayenne pepper, or more to taste

Press tofu if necessary: Line a baking sheet with a clean dishtowel. Cut tofu into 6 equal-sized slices (each slice should be about 1/4-inch) and place on the dishtowel in a single layer. Cover with a second clean dishtowel and top with a cutting board. Place several heavy objects (canned food, books, jars of beans) on the cutting board. Let stand 30 minutes.

In the meantime, prepare barbeque sauce. Combine ketchup, apple juice concentrate, vinegar, soy sauce, onion and garlic powder, black pepper, and cayenne pepper in a small measuring cup or mixing bowl.

Remove tofu from the press and pat dry. Carefully arrange in a sandwich-sized zip-top bag, then add marinade. Seal the bag, then carefully massage it so that all the tofu slices are coated with marinade. Refrigerate 4 hours or more (overnight is ideal), turning the bag occasionally to keep all the slices coated.

Preheat oven to 375 F. Remove tofu from bag and place it in a glass baking dish. Drizzle with any remaining sauce and bake, uncovered, until dry and deep golden brown, about 35 minutes.

Per slice:
Calories: 87
Fat: 3.3 g
Saturated Fat: 0.7 g
Calories from Fat: 33.6%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 6.7 g
Carbohydrates: 9.4 g
Sugar: 6.9 g
Fiber: 0.9 g
Sodium: 212 mg
Calcium: 159 mg
Iron: 1.5 mg
Vitamin C: 2 mg
Beta Carotene: 60 mcg
Vitamin E: 0.2 mg

Source: Healthy Eating for Life for Children by Amy Lanou, Ph.D.; recipe by Jennifer Raymond, M.S., R.D.

Pueblo Pie

Makes 12 servings

Pueblo Pie is like a Southwestern lasagna, with layers of corn tortillas, tangy garbanzo spread, chili beans, corn, and a spicy tomato sauce. Serve it with a green salad for a very satisfying meal.

1/2 cup + 2/3 cup water, divided
1 large onion, chopped
1 tablespoon minced garlic (about 4 large cloves)
1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes
4 teaspoons chili powder
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 12-ounce package vegetarian ground beef substitute
1 15-ounce can garbanzo beans, drained
1/2 cup chopped roasted red peppers (about 2 peppers)
3 tablespoons tahini (sesame seed butter)
3 tablespoons lemon juice
12 corn tortillas, torn in half
2 15-ounce cans vegetarian chili beans
1 cup chopped green onions
1 - 2 cup fresh or frozen corn

Heat 1/2 cup of water in a large pot or skillet. Add onion and garlic and cook until soft, about 5 minutes. Add tomatoes, chili powder, cumin, vegetarian ground beef substitute, and 2/3 cup of water. Simmer over medium heat 5 minutes.

Process garbanzo beans, roasted peppers, tahini, and lemon juice in a food processor or blender until very smooth.

Preheat oven to 350 F.

Spread about 1/2 cup of the tomato sauce in the bottom of a 9"×13" (or larger) baking dish. Cover with a layer of tortillas, then spread with a third of the garbanzo bean mixture, holding tortillas in place with your fingers. Sprinkle with a third of the chili beans, green onions, and corn. Spread about 1 cup of tomato sauce over the top.

Repeat layers twice, ending with tomato sauce. Make sure all the tortillas are covered. Bake 20 minutes, until hot and bubbly.

Per serving (1/12 of casserole):
Calories: 229
Fat: 5 g
Saturated Fat: 0.7 g
Calories from Fat: 19.6%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 13 g
Carbohydrates: 36 g
Sugar: 5.4 g
Fiber: 7 g
Sodium: 617 mg
Calcium: 112 mg
Iron: 4.1 mg
Vitamin C: 25.6 mg
Beta Carotene: 403 mcg
Vitamin E: 1.3 mg

Source: Healthy Eating for Life to Prevent and Treat Diabetes by Patricia Bertron, R.D.; recipe by Jennifer Raymond, M.S., R.D.

Simple Bean Tacos

Makes 8 tacos

These soft-shell tacos are a quick and easy snack or meal. Several companies make vegetarian refried beans. Look for them in natural food stores and many supermarkets.

1 15-ounce can vegetarian refried beans
8 corn tortillas
1/2 - 1 cup Salsa Fresca or commercial salsa
2 cups pre-washed salad mix
3 green onions, chopped
2 tomatoes, chopped

Heat beans on the stove or in a microwave.

Spread a tortilla with about 1/4 cup of beans, and lay it flat in a nonstick skillet over medium heat. When tortilla is warm and pliable, fold it in half and cook each side 1 minute. Garnish with salsa, salad mix, green onions, and tomatoes.

Per taco:
Calories: 112
Fat: 1 g
Saturated Fat: 0.2 g
Calories from Fat: 8.3%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 5 g
Carbohydrates: 22.2 g
Sugar: 2.1 g
Fiber: 5.2 g
Sodium: 248 mg
Calcium: 52 mg
Iron: 1.4 mg
Vitamin C: 9.9 mg
Beta Carotene: 642 mcg
Vitamin E: 0.8 mg

Source: Healthy Eating for Life to Prevent and Treat Diabetes by Patricia Bertron, R.D.; recipe by Jennifer Raymond, M.S., R.D.

Peppered Pasta

Makes 4 servings

1 16-ounce package dry pasta
1/2 cup Vegetable Broth
2 leeks
1 15-ounce can small white beans, drained and rinsed
1 10-ounce jar roasted red peppers, chopped
1/3 cup chopped fresh basil
1 tablespoon drained capers
1 freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Cook pasta according to package directions. Drain and place in a bowl. Set aside.

Place broth in a saucepan with leeks. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 3 minutes. Add remaining ingredients. Cook, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes.

Pour sauce over pasta and mix well. Serve at once.

Per serving (1/4 of recipe):
Calories: 573
Fat: 2.6 g
Saturated Fat: 0.4 g
Calories from Fat: 4%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 23.2 g
Carbohydrates: 113.9 g
Sugar: 6.2 g
Fiber: 12.5 g
Sodium: 191 mg
Calcium: 111 mg
Iron: 7.6 mg
Vitamin C: 86.6 mg
Beta Carotene: 1330 mcg
Vitamin E: 1.8 mg

Source: Mary McDougall of the McDougall Program www.drmcdougall.com

Pasta with Lentil Marinara Sauce

Makes 5 servings

1 pound dry pasta of choice
1 26-ounce jar fat-free low-sodium tomato-based pasta sauce
1 15-ounce can lentils, rinsed and drained
1/2 cup dry red wine (can be nonalcoholic) or low-sodium vegetable broth
salt, to taste
freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Cook pasta according to package directions, then drain.

Meanwhile, combine pasta sauce, lentils, and wine or broth in a medium saucepan. Heat gently and season with the salt and black pepper. Serve over pasta.

Per serving (1/5 of recipe):
Calories: 539
Fat: 2.7 g
Saturated Fat: 0.5 g
Calories from Fat: 4.5%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 20.7 g
Carbohydrates: 103.2 g
Sugar: 11.7 g
Fiber: 8.8 g
Sodium: 264 mg
Calcium: 45 mg
Iron: 5.9 mg
Vitamin C: 6.4 mg
Beta Carotene: 239 mcg
Vitamin E: 0.7 mg

Source: Dr. Neal Barnard’s Program for Reversing Diabetes: The Scientifically Proven System for Reversing Diabetes Without Drugs by Neal D. Barnard, M.D.; recipe by Bryanna Clark Grogan

Pan-Seared Portobello Mushrooms

Makes 4 servings

These giant mushrooms make a hearty, meatlike entree. Serve them with brown rice, pasta, or couscous.

4 large portobello mushrooms
2 tablespoons red wine or water
2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
2 garlic cloves, pressed
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

Clean mushrooms, trimming stems flush with bottom of caps.

Mix wine or water, soy sauce, vinegar, garlic, and oregano in a large skillet. Heat until mixture begins to bubble, then add mushrooms, top side down. Reduce to medium heat, cover and cook 3 minutes. If the pan becomes dry, add 2 to 3 tablespoons of water. Turn mushrooms and cook second side until tender when pierced with a sharp knife, about 5 minutes. Serve hot.

Per mushroom:
Calories: 58
Fat: 2.8 g
Saturated Fat: 0.4 g
Calories from Fat: 43.6%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 3.3 g
Carbohydrates: 4.9 g
Sugar: 0.2 g
Fiber: 1.8 g
Sodium: 273 mg
Calcium: 10 mg
Iron: 0.7 mg
Vitamin C: 0.5 mg
Beta Carotene: 5 mcg
Vitamin E: 0.4 mg

Source: Healthy Eating for Life for Women by Kristine Kieswer; recipe by Jennifer Raymond, M.S., R.D.

Ginger Noodles

Makes 4 1-cup servings

These exotic-tasting noodles are surprisingly easy to prepare. Soba noodles are made from buckwheat flour and are sold in natural food stores and Asian markets.

1 8-ounce package soba noodles
3 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
3 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh ginger
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 - 1 jalapeno pepper, finely chopped
2 green onions, finely chopped, including tops
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro (optional)

Cook noodles in boiling water according to package directions. When tender, drain and rinse. Mix vinegar, soy sauce, ginger, garlic, jalapeno pepper, green onions, and cilantro, if using, then pour over cooked noodles and toss to mix.

Per 1-cup serving:
Calories: 211
Fat: 0.8 g
Saturated Fat: 0.2 g
Calories from Fat: 3.6%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 8.8 g
Carbohydrates: 45.2 g
Sugar: 5.2 g
Fiber: 4.5 g
Sodium: 581 mg
Calcium: 32 mg
Iron: 1.9 mg
Vitamin C: 3.5 mg
Beta Carotene: 48 mcg
Vitamin E: 0.5 mg

Source: Healthy Eating for Life to Prevent and Treat Cancer by Vesanto Melina, M.S., R.D.; recipe by Jennifer Raymond, M.S., R.D.

Lazy Lasagna

Makes 8 servings

Your days of soaking lasagna noodles and eating high-fat lasagna are over. Enjoy this cholesterol- and dairy-free meal which also boasts tons of filling fiber and cancer-fighting nutrients. Top this dish off with fortified nutritional yeast for a cheesier flavor and for added vitamin B-12.

1 16-ounce bag chopped frozen spinach, thawed, or 3 pounds fresh spinach, rinsed and chopped
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried basil, or 10 fresh basil leaves, thinly sliced
10 button mushrooms, sliced, or other favorite vegetable equivalent to about 3 cups chopped
1 pound dry whole-wheat lasagna noodles
2 28-ounce cans plain tomato sauce
1 teaspoon salt
4 garlic cloves, minced or pressed
1 pound firm reduced-fat tofu
1/4 cup dairy-free (vegan) parmesan cheese substitute or nutritional yeast

Preheat oven to 325 F.

Mix together spinach, tofu, garlic, and salt in a mixing bowl.

In a 9"×13" pan, coat the bottom with tomato sauce (about 1/2 cup) followed by a layer of lasagna noodles, overlapping noodles slightly. Spread 1/2 of the spinach and tofu mixture on top of the lasagna noodles, and cover the spinach and tofu layer with another layer of lasagna noodles. Add a layer of tomato sauce, enough to cover the noodles, and then add a layer of mushrooms or other veggies. Sprinkle 1/2 of the basil and 1/2 teaspoon of oregano evenly over the veggies. Continue to add layers of noodles, spinach and tofu, sauce, mushrooms or other veggies, and remaining basil and oregano (1/2 teaspoon) until the layers reach the top of the pan. The final layer should be sauce topped with vegan parmesan substitute or nutritional yeast.

Cover tightly with aluminum foil and bake for 1 hour. Stick a knife through the center of the lasagna to make sure the noodles are completely cooked. Let cool for 15 minutes, uncovered, before serving.

Stored in a covered container in the refrigerator, leftover Lazy Lasagna will keep for up to 3 days.

Per serving:
Calories: 334
Fat: 4.6 g
Saturated Fat: 0.7 g
Calories from Fat: 12.4%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 18.4 g
Carbohydrates: 62.8 g
Sugar: 10.3 g
Fiber: 11 g
Sodium: 1449 mg
Calcium: 147 mg
Iron: 6.3 mg
Vitamin C: 16.9 mg
Beta Carotene: 3152 mcg
Vitamin E: 6.2 mg

Source: The Survivor’s Handbook: Eating Right for Cancer Survival by Neal D. Barnard, M.D. and Jennifer Reilly, R.D.

Baked Tofu

Makes 4 slices

Baking tofu in a marinade is a simple way to infuse it with flavor. Enjoy it as a finger food or snack, or add it to soups, salads, and other prepared dishes. For best results, start with tofu that is firm or extra-firm, and make certain it is fresh by checking the expiration date on the package.

1 pound low-fat extra-firm tofu (see note below)
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons water or unsalted vegetable broth
2 teaspoons brown rice syrup or similar sweetener
2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1 1/2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 400 F.

Cut tofu into 4 slices. Arrange in a single, tightly-packed layer in a baking dish. Mix soy sauce with water or broth. Stir in brown rice syrup or other sweetener, vinegar, garlic, ginger, and black pepper, then pour evenly over tofu. Bake 30 minutes.

Stored in a covered container in the refrigerator, leftover Baked Tofu will keep for up to 3 days.

Note: Some tofu that is labeled “firm” is actually quite soft. To make it firmer, line a baking sheet with a clean dish towel. Cut tofu into 4 slices and arrange in a single layer on the towel. Cover with a second clean towel and top with a cutting board. Place several heavy objects (canned food, books, or jars of beans) on the cutting board. Let stand 30 minutes before proceeding with recipe. Alternatively, slice tofu and freeze prior to use to help maintain its texture. Frozen tofu can be put directly into the recipe.

Per slice:
Calories: 155
Fat: 8.4 g
Saturated Fat: 1.2 g
Calories from Fat: 48.9%
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Protein: 15.5 g
Carbohydrates: 7.8 g
Sugar: 2.7 g
Fiber: 0.6 g
Sodium: 474 mg
Calcium: 260 mg
Iron: 2.8 mg
Vitamin C: 1 mg
Beta Carotene: 9 mcg
Vitamin E: 0 mg

Source: The Survivor’s Handbook: Eating Right for Cancer Survival by Neal D. Barnard, M.D. and Jennifer Reilly, R.D.



 

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