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The Physicians Committee



21st-Century Chemical Regulation: Ensuring Protective Chemical Regulations That Avoid Animal Testing

Concerned Citizens

We asked people to share why they think Congress should reform toxicity testing and include specific animal protection measures in the revisions to the Toxic Substances Control Act, the law that regulates industrial chemicals. People all over the country agree that animal testing does not belong in the 21st century. Here are few individuals concerned about the use of animals in chemical tests. We hope their words inspire you to share your own >

Angie G.

Because not only am I an animal lover, but I am also a parent.

- Angie G., Florida

Addison

My rabbits are one of the highlights of my life. Padme and Jerry are a bonded pair, so they are with each other every moment of every day. I can’t imagine rabbits and other animals just like them being the subject of cruel testing and living their lives without companionship. No animal should be used for testing when nonanimal tests are more accurate and reliable. I look forward to the day when all chemical testing is done without animals, and I'm depending on Congress to make that happen.

- Addison B., Kansas

Shanna

I'm concerned about animal testing because it is outdated and unneeded. Working for the greater good does not include testing on animals, who feel pain and are subjected to tests which can be performed on "synthetic skin." I am not a scientist, but I surely am an environmental advocate and someone with a huge heart who does not support companies that test on animals.

- Shanna G., Wisconsin

Holly

I first learned about animal testing from an acquaintance who showed me a picture of a rabbit with a severely injured eye. She told me cosmetics were routinely tested on animals in that way. Not only did it seem cruel, it seemed crude and unscientific. This kind of "safety testing" is supposed to protect us, but the sense of security we feel is false. Whenever possible, I buy products that are not tested on animals.

- Holly P., Massachusetts

Olivia

In the past, the toxicology field has created experimental procedures using animals as test subjects. These tests have now become obsolete with the discovery of new techniques and the onset of advanced technology. Methods that were once considered the gold standard are
now considered archaic. There is a growing understanding that interspecies testing does not provide the accurate results that we once believed it did. With the development of new methods and the discovery of new information, why continue to implement inferior practices that cause such physical and emotional agony to other sentient beings? Help support nonanimal testing!

- Olivia P., California

Heather

From the time I first learned about the Draize and LD-50 testing back in the 1970s, I had always hoped that technology would change and we would soon be using only nonanimal testing for chemicals. I am encouraged that the Safe Chemical Act of 2010 is heading in the right direction but hope that the additional list of items from the animal protection community will be included to improve the efficiency, accuracy, and speed of the tests. Europe seems to be developing more efficient methods and moving away from animal testing. I am hoping that our technology will advance quickly and move in the same direction.

- Heather S., Massachusetts



 

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