Tag Archives: Recipe

The Shameful Sham of Shamrock Shakes

Every March, McDonald’s releases its Shamrock Shake in dubious honor of St. Patrick’s Day. This dairy-and-syrup-heavy minty green beverage is supposed to make the month extra-festive. However, with 12 grams of saturated fat, nearly a quarter of your daily maximum cholesterol, and 660 calories, shake guzzlers will need the luck o’ the Irish to keep the jig in their step afterwards.

Using chemical coloring and corn syrup to make a high-cholesterol dairy item match the month’s color scheme? It’s enough to make a banshee wail! There are so many naturally green foods that are actually good for you. Green apples, kale, broccoli, pistachios, honeydew melon, kiwis—they all create a nutritional pot of gold.

With dairy’s connection to certain cancers, don’t try your luck with the Shamrock Shake. Instead, start spring off on the right foot with our Green Goddess Smoothie. Or for a more decadent treat, check out The Edgy Veg’s Vegan Mint Milkshake!

Green Goddess Smoothie

Green Goddess Smoothie

Makes 5 1-cup servings

1 orange, peeled
1 cup grapes
1 banana
1 pear, cored
1 cup soy, almond, or rice milk
2 cups fresh kale or spinach
ice cubes (optional)

Place all ingredients in the blender for 1 minute, or until desired smoothness is achieved.

Add ice cubes, if using, and process further to desired temperature.

Per 1-cup serving:

  • Calories: 110
  • Fat: 1.1 g
  • Saturated Fat: 0.2 g
  • Calories from Fat: 8.5%
  • Cholesterol: 0 mg
  • Protein: 3.1 g
  • Carbohydrates: 24.5 g
  • Sugar: 14.9 g
  • Fiber: 3.8 g
  • Sodium: 36 mg
  • Calcium: 99 mg
  • Iron: 1 mg
  • Vitamin C: 33.1 mg
  • Beta Carotene: 2464 mcg
  • Vitamin E: 1.2 mg

Source: Katherine Lawrence, owner of www.plantbasedhealth.com

Vegetarian? Yeah, Yeah, Yeah!

Years ago, while gazing out the window at the meadow surrounding their house, Paul and Linda McCartney watched lambs playing. They were having such a lovely time gamboling about in the sunshine. Paul and Linda then glanced at the sliced lamb on their plates. And that was it. It took only a moment to make the decision. Out with the meat, chicken, fish—all of it—and they never looked back. Ringo quit eating meat decades ago, too.

If a plant-based diet keeps these Beatles rocking after all these years, maybe it’ll do the same for you. Here are some recipes to get you going.

Sergeant Pepper Would Have Banged the Drum for This Red Pepper Hummus
Red Pepper Hummus

Red Pepper Hummus

Makes about 2 cups

Red pepper hummus makes a delicious dip for fresh vegetables or pita wedges. It can also be used as a sandwich spread or as a filling in a wrap.

1 15-ounce can garbanzo beans, drained
1/2 cup water-packed roasted red peppers (about 2 peppers)
2 tablespoons tahini (sesame seed butter)
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1 garlic clove (or more to taste)
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

Combine all ingredients in a food processor. Process until completely smooth, about 2 minutes.

Per 1/4 cup
• Calories: 87
• Fat: 3 g
• Saturated Fat: 0.4 g
• Calories from Fat: 31.2%
• Cholesterol: 0 mg
• Protein: 4 g
• Carbohydrates: 12 g
• Sugar: 1.1 g
• Fiber: 2.8 g
• Sodium: 57 mg
• Calcium: 37 mg
• Iron: 1.5 mg
• Vitamin C: 21.7 mg
• Beta-Carotene: 265 mcg
• Vitamin E: 0.3 mg

Source: Healthy Eating for Life for Women by Kristine Kieswer; recipe by Jennifer Raymond, M.S., R.D.

Mean Mr. Mustard Would Be All Over Our Broccoli…
Broccoli with Mustard Sauce

Makes 4 to 6 servings

This is royally delicious treatment for broccoli, a potent cancer-fighter.

1 bunch broccoli
1/4 cup seasoned rice vinegar
1 teaspoon stone-ground or Dijon mustard
1 garlic clove, pressed or minced

Break broccoli into bite-size florets. Peel broccoli stems and slice into 1/4″ rounds. Steam until just tender, about 5 minutes. While the broccoli is steaming, whisk vinegar, mustard, and garlic in a serving bowl. Add broccoli and toss. Serve immediately.

Per serving (1/4 of recipe)
• Calories: 58
• Fat: 0.5 g
• Saturated Fat: 0.1 g
• Calories from Fat: 7.1%
• Cholesterol: 0 mg
• Protein: 2.5 g
• Carbohydrates: 12.6 g
• Sugar: 6.1 g
• Fiber: 3.4 g
• Sodium: 293 mg
• Calcium: 44 mg
• Iron: 0.7 mg
• Vitamin C: 66.3 mg
• Beta-Carotene: 946 mcg
• Vitamin E: 2.1 mg

Source: New Century Nutrition


A few extra options:

Yellow Soup to Match Your “Yellow Submarine”
Yellow Split Pea and Sweet Potato Soup

You’ll be in “Strawberry Fields Forever” with Our Strawberry Delight
Strawberry Delight

“Ain’t She Sweet”? Especially if She’s Eating These Waffles
Sweet Potato Waffles

“Wild Honey Pie” is Sweet and Simple, Just Like This Pie!
Date-Nut Fruit Pie

Here’s What They’re Serving in the “Octopus’s Garden”
Garden Stuffed Pitas

Carrots Not Cookies for Santa

The days of Santa’s belly shaking like a bowl full of jelly are over, now that he’s gone vegetarian. To help Santa stay slim chimney after chimney, it’s time to revamp the old-fashioned “cookies and milk” into something more healthful. So if you are prepping a snack for Santa with your children, you may want to make your ingredients list and check it twice. Developing good eating habits early in life can help children skip diabetes, obesity, and even heart disease later on.

The Nutrition Rainbow

Just one Tollhouse Chocolate Chip Cookie has 250 calories and 6 grams of saturated fat. If you leave even four cookies out for Santa, you’re giving him over 128 percent of his maximum saturated fat intake. (And since we all know that sometimes one of Santa’s “helpers” gets the cookies, you’re not doing him or her any favors either.) This is the perfect opportunity to start a new tradition. Gather the family and make some Super Raspberry Protein Brownies or a Masala Chai Apple Crisp. Share the Nutrition Rainbow and illustrate why certain foods are better for you than others. Explain that Santa’s got a long journey ahead of him, and you want to help him feel his best. For a simpler, quicker treat, try leaving a plate of hummus and carrots. Santa will appreciate the vitamin C boost for his immune system—and he can even share the carrots with Rudolph.

During the holiday season and beyond, take the time to cook with your children. Teach them about nutrition to set them up for a lifetime of health. They may not have “future good health and habits” on any of their birthday or holiday wish lists, but they’ll sure thank you for it in the years to come!

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