Category Archives: Vegan

2013: The Final Countdown

This week, we’re all counting down to the start of a new year. How was 2013 for you? Did you quit smoking or complete our 21-Day Vegan Kickstart? Did you improve your diet and kick your diabetes medications to the curb?

2013 was a big year for health-conscious people. So we’re counting down with this list of some of the major trends from 2013!

Hopefully everyone has a healthy, happy new year! Let’s keep the good habits rolling into 2014 and beyond. Here are a few of the noteworthy events of the year:

5 Healthy Trends

  • Vegan Fast-Food Options: In February, Chipotle launched its plant-based Sofrita in the Bay Area. Due to popular demand, the test launch rapidly increased to include all of California. By October, the Sofrita had reached the East Coast! Subway also jumped on the vegan fast-food bandwagon and debuted a falafel sandwich at select East Coast locations. Dominos has also dipped their toe into the vegan international market, by releasing a vegan pizza in Israel.
  • The 21-Day Vegan Kickstart: Our global Kickstart programs reached a total of 300,000 participants! Kickstart Japan was just added to the lineup of international Kickstart programs. All of the programs help reverse the problems of meat and dairy products with plant-based recipes and resources.
  • Plant-Based Thanksgiving: After the release of the turkey-friendly movie Free Birds, The New York Times featured more than 600 vegetarian and vegan recipes in their Thanksgiving recipe database.
  • Healthy School Lunches: P.S. 244Q in Queens, N.Y., won the grand prize in this year’s Golden Carrot Award with their completely vegetarian school cafeteria menu.
  • Meatless Monday: This year, Meatless Monday marked their 10th anniversary! With schools, city councils, restaurants, and hospital across the globe participating in Meatless Mondays, the program is more popular than ever.

4 Vegan Celebrities

  • Just in time for Thanksgiving, Al Gore transitioned to a plant-based diet—helping improve his health and the environment.
  • Tia Mowry went public with how a vegan diet helped her get healthy—and start a family!
  • For Jay Z’s 44th birthday, he and Beyoncé adopted a 22-day vegan diet. They frequented vegan restaurants, uploading photos to Instagram and promoting plant-based recipes. They started it as an experiment, but hopefully they’ll like it so much they’ll decide to put a ring on it.
  • Santa Claus is vegetarian! At the prompting of his elves, Santa made the switch to a vegetarian diet so his belly no longer shakes like a bowl full of jelly.

3 Big Events

2 Innovative Food Inventions

  • Treeline Cheese launched a hard nut cheese now available at grocery stores and restaurants across the country. Made of cashews and entirely plant-based, it is tangy, creamy, and cholesterol free.
  • The first in-vitro burger debuted this year in the U.K. While meat is still an unhealthful food item, this advancement does remove the slaughter of animals and allows for the potential removal of the artery-clogging components.

1 New Book

  • Power Foods for the Brain: In February, I released Power Foods for the Brain and gave talks all across the country. Along with our new PBS show on the same topic, we helped people learn how to use food to combat memory loss.

There were many more items we could have picked, and so much more coming for the new year!

Carrots Not Cookies for Santa

The days of Santa’s belly shaking like a bowl full of jelly are over, now that he’s gone vegetarian. To help Santa stay slim chimney after chimney, it’s time to revamp the old-fashioned “cookies and milk” into something more healthful. So if you are prepping a snack for Santa with your children, you may want to make your ingredients list and check it twice. Developing good eating habits early in life can help children skip diabetes, obesity, and even heart disease later on.

The Nutrition Rainbow

Just one Tollhouse Chocolate Chip Cookie has 250 calories and 6 grams of saturated fat. If you leave even four cookies out for Santa, you’re giving him over 128 percent of his maximum saturated fat intake. (And since we all know that sometimes one of Santa’s “helpers” gets the cookies, you’re not doing him or her any favors either.) This is the perfect opportunity to start a new tradition. Gather the family and make some Super Raspberry Protein Brownies or a Masala Chai Apple Crisp. Share the Nutrition Rainbow and illustrate why certain foods are better for you than others. Explain that Santa’s got a long journey ahead of him, and you want to help him feel his best. For a simpler, quicker treat, try leaving a plate of hummus and carrots. Santa will appreciate the vitamin C boost for his immune system—and he can even share the carrots with Rudolph.

During the holiday season and beyond, take the time to cook with your children. Teach them about nutrition to set them up for a lifetime of health. They may not have “future good health and habits” on any of their birthday or holiday wish lists, but they’ll sure thank you for it in the years to come!

The Best Memory Trick? Going Vegan!

There’s a new World Memory Champion on the block. Last night, Jonas Von Essen, a 23-year-old from Sweden, achieved the highest score in the history of the World Memory Championship. Essen has wowed audiences with his ability to memorize the order of an entire deck of playing cards in about 30 seconds. Following his unprecedented victory, the winner had just one thing on his mind: finding a vegan cupcake.Vegan Cards

It’s no surprise that a memory champion would be eating plant-based foods, especially if he wants to keep his brain sharp long-term. Studies have shown that a healthful diet can impact your memory. In fact, foods high in vitamin E—such as almonds, walnuts, and even broccoli—can reduce dementia risk by as much as 70 percent.

If you’re looking for a sweet treat that will also help your brain, try a handful of blueberries. Fit for a champion, blueberries are rich in brain-boosting anthocyanins. Add them to your oatmeal—or whip up a batch of our Blueberry Buckwheat Pancakes. There may be only one World Memory Champion, but we can all strengthen our brain with a diet full of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes.

Blueberry Buckwheat Pancakes

Serves 2 to 4

Blueberry Buckwheat PancakesThese whole-grain pancakes drizzled with pure maple syrup make for a delicious and hearty breakfast. Blueberries and aluminum-free baking powder add a delicious and healthful touch.

*Note: Aluminum’s role in the brain remains controversial. However, because aluminum has been found in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients, it pays to err on the side of caution. Avoid uncoated aluminum cookware and read labels when buying baking powder, antacids, and processed foods.

1/2 cup buckwheat flour
1/2 cup whole-wheat pastry flour
2 teaspoons flaxseed meal
1 teaspoon aluminum-free baking powder*
Pinch of sea salt
1 cup rice milk
1 cup fresh blueberries
1-2 teaspoons safflower oil, to brush the skillet
warmed maple syrup, for drizzling

In a medium bowl, combine the buckwheat flour, whole-wheat pastry flour, flaxseed meal, baking powder, and salt. Whisk briefly to blend. Slowly stir in the rice milk and stir just until the lumps disappear. Gently fold in the blueberries.

Heat a cast-iron griddle or skillet over medium heat, then lightly brush with a little of the safflower oil. Add enough batter to form a 4-inch pancake and cook until the edges look dry and bubbly, about 2 to 3 minutes. Gently flip the pancake and cook on the other side until golden, about 2 to 3 minutes. Serve hot, with warmed maple syrup.

Per pancake: 82 calories, 2 g protein, 16 g carbohydrate, 3 g sugar, 1 g total fat, 13% calories from fat, 2 g fiber, 112 mg sodium

Recipe by natural foods chef Christine Waltermyer, C.H.H.C.

Breakfast Smoothie

Serves 2 (Makes about 3 cups)

1 very ripe banana (with plenty of brown speckles)
2 cups frozen fruit (such as berries, mangoes, strawberries, banana, orange, and pineapple)
1 cup nondairy milk (almond milk or soy milk)

Combine all the ingredients in a blender. Start your blender on the lowest setting and slowly crank it up as the smoothie starts to puree. If you start with your blender at high, you’ll end up with smoothie splattered all over the top of your blender and probably will have to stop your blender several times to get the smoothie ingredients to rest back on the blades. Once you’re up to optimal speed, blend for about 2 minutes to get everything smooth.

Per smoothie or 1 1/2 cup serving: 190 calories, 2 g protein, 46 g carbohydrate, 35 g sugar, 2 g total fat, 9% calories from fat, 5 g fiber, 79 mg sodium

Recipe by Jason Wyrick; Power Foods for the Brain by Neal Barnard, M.D.