Category Archives: Cancer

Remembering Michio Kushi

Photo of Michio Kushi from the Kushi Institute’s Flickr page.

On Dec. 28, 2014, Michio Kushi—the man who introduced the macrobiotic diet to the Western world—passed away. He was 88. I first met Michio 30 years ago and was struck by the power of macrobiotic diets for health. Based on principles of Chinese medicine and interpreted through Japanese cuisine, this largely plant-based school of thought has helped many people regain their health.

For those unfamiliar with macrobiotic diets, I would like to reprint the experience of Anthony J. Sattilaro, M.D., from my book Foods That Fight Pain. I first met Tony in 1986. The events I will describe here began several years before.

Read the excerpt from Foods That Fight Pain

Orange Is the New Pink

This is a guest blog from Physicians Committee director of nutrition education Susan Levin, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D.

Orange is the New Pink

In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, both individuals and businesses don pink ribbons in the fight against breast cancer. But while pink has become synonymous with breast cancer, orange is the color that can actually help prevent this disease.  Women who consume the most orange vegetables, which are rich in carotenoids, lower their risk of breast cancer by 19 percent.

One type of carotenoid is beta-carotene, which many people associate with carrots. The Institute of Medicine recommends women consume a daily serving of 3 to 6 milligrams of beta-carotene to reduce the risk of disease. Carrots are a great source of beta-carotene, but there are so many other foods that are packed with this immunity-boosting nutrient. One cup of butternut squash has up to three times the suggested minimum amount!

Orange is the New Pink

As we head into autumn, many carotenoid-rich vegetables are in season. Fill your grocery cart with orange foods and stop by the farmers market for some pumpkin, squash, winter squash, and sweet potatoes. Spread the word by sharing the graphic—and make sure that even if you’re wearing pink, you’re still eating orange!

Click here to take the Orange Pledge!

For more information: www.OrangeIsTheNewPink.org

Meat-Eating Falls to Lowest Levels in 3 Decades

The USDA’s latest figures show that Americans are continuing to turn away from meat. Meat consumption reached a high of 201.5 pounds per capita in 2004 but has dropped steadily since then, reaching 181.5 pounds in 2012, the latest year for which figures are available. The last time meat intake was at this level was 1983. These figures show that the average American is consuming 20 pounds less meat each year, compared to a decade ago.

In the post-World-War-II era, meat intake rose steadily. It began to decline a decade ago in the face of concerns about health, animal welfare, and the environment, as well as the ready availability of healthier foods.

Skipping meat has many advantages. People who avoid meat are thinner than meat-eaters. In a 2009 study published by the American Diabetes Association, meat-eaters had an average body mass index (BMI) of 28.8, well above 25.0, the upper limit for a healthful weight. But people who avoided animal products had an average BMI of 23.6. Avoiding meat also cuts the risk of diabetes, cancer, and heart disease and improves blood pressure.

per-capita-meat-intake

Click here for Drop the Dog, Pick A Plant Recipe Cards.

 

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