Monthly Archives: February 2014

An Event that’s Absolutely Sublime

sublime-restaurant-and-bar

Today, I’ll be leaving the polar vortex behind and catching a flight to Fort Lauderdale to attend a special event benefiting the Physicians Committee. This event is hosted by Nanci Alexander at her legendary Sublime Restaurant.

Sometimes celebrations can come at the expense of your waistline or heart health—but not at Sublime! This award-winning restaurant features an entirely plant-based menu of global cuisine. In fact, the Sublime Restaurant Cookbook topped the Physicians Committee’s list of the Best Cookbooks of the Decade.

Nanci Alexander, Sublime’s creator, hosted the first Physicians Committee benefit event back in 2008! It was a hit with celebrities, supporters, and friends. This year, I ‘m looking forward to sharing the success of our research studies—including our new study on vegetarian diets and blood pressure and our new research showing the link between meat and diabetes—as well as our many other efforts for plant-based diets. Thanks to these programs, and those of our many allies, meat-eating has fallen to its lowest level in decades.

Hopefully, I’ll see you all there. But even if you won’t be attending the benefit this Friday, be sure to check out Sublime’s menu online and make a reservation the next time you’re in Fort Lauderdale!
sublime-restaurant-neal
(Sublime owner Nanci Alexander, Neal Barnard, M.D., and Marilu Henner from the very first PCRM event at Sublime in 2008!)

ED this VD? It’s not you, it’s meat.

Between 18 and 30 million men in the United States have erectile dysfunction. It’s certainly a topic everyone’s familiar with—the image of a little blue pill or two outdoor bathtubs is practically iconic. But most people don’t know that ED isn’t usually caused by stress, alcohol, or performance anxiety—it’s a result of blocked arteries. The cholesterol and saturated fat in animal products can lead to vascular problems, which in turn impede blood flow. Gorge on chicken wings and steak, and the only thing that will grow later is your waistline.

Over a six-year span, the U.S. government spent $172 million on penis pumps—expensive contraptions that try to draw blood flow through narrowed arteries. There’s a much less expensive solution: A low-fat, plant-based diet will reverse artery blockage, letting blood flow to where you need it. In fact, while processed meat products cause low-quality sperm, carrots and other vegetables can actually boost virility.

So to those who take their sweetheart out for a big steak dinner this Valentine’s Day only to discover that they’re having some technical difficulties later on, remember—it’s not you, it’s meat.

 

Vegetarian? Yeah, Yeah, Yeah!

Years ago, while gazing out the window at the meadow surrounding their house, Paul and Linda McCartney watched lambs playing. They were having such a lovely time gamboling about in the sunshine. Paul and Linda then glanced at the sliced lamb on their plates. And that was it. It took only a moment to make the decision. Out with the meat, chicken, fish—all of it—and they never looked back. Ringo quit eating meat decades ago, too.

If a plant-based diet keeps these Beatles rocking after all these years, maybe it’ll do the same for you. Here are some recipes to get you going.

Sergeant Pepper Would Have Banged the Drum for This Red Pepper Hummus
Red Pepper Hummus

Red Pepper Hummus

Makes about 2 cups

Red pepper hummus makes a delicious dip for fresh vegetables or pita wedges. It can also be used as a sandwich spread or as a filling in a wrap.

1 15-ounce can garbanzo beans, drained
1/2 cup water-packed roasted red peppers (about 2 peppers)
2 tablespoons tahini (sesame seed butter)
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1 garlic clove (or more to taste)
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

Combine all ingredients in a food processor. Process until completely smooth, about 2 minutes.

Per 1/4 cup
• Calories: 87
• Fat: 3 g
• Saturated Fat: 0.4 g
• Calories from Fat: 31.2%
• Cholesterol: 0 mg
• Protein: 4 g
• Carbohydrates: 12 g
• Sugar: 1.1 g
• Fiber: 2.8 g
• Sodium: 57 mg
• Calcium: 37 mg
• Iron: 1.5 mg
• Vitamin C: 21.7 mg
• Beta-Carotene: 265 mcg
• Vitamin E: 0.3 mg

Source: Healthy Eating for Life for Women by Kristine Kieswer; recipe by Jennifer Raymond, M.S., R.D.

Mean Mr. Mustard Would Be All Over Our Broccoli…
Broccoli with Mustard Sauce

Makes 4 to 6 servings

This is royally delicious treatment for broccoli, a potent cancer-fighter.

1 bunch broccoli
1/4 cup seasoned rice vinegar
1 teaspoon stone-ground or Dijon mustard
1 garlic clove, pressed or minced

Break broccoli into bite-size florets. Peel broccoli stems and slice into 1/4″ rounds. Steam until just tender, about 5 minutes. While the broccoli is steaming, whisk vinegar, mustard, and garlic in a serving bowl. Add broccoli and toss. Serve immediately.

Per serving (1/4 of recipe)
• Calories: 58
• Fat: 0.5 g
• Saturated Fat: 0.1 g
• Calories from Fat: 7.1%
• Cholesterol: 0 mg
• Protein: 2.5 g
• Carbohydrates: 12.6 g
• Sugar: 6.1 g
• Fiber: 3.4 g
• Sodium: 293 mg
• Calcium: 44 mg
• Iron: 0.7 mg
• Vitamin C: 66.3 mg
• Beta-Carotene: 946 mcg
• Vitamin E: 2.1 mg

Source: New Century Nutrition


A few extra options:

Yellow Soup to Match Your “Yellow Submarine”
Yellow Split Pea and Sweet Potato Soup

You’ll be in “Strawberry Fields Forever” with Our Strawberry Delight
Strawberry Delight

“Ain’t She Sweet”? Especially if She’s Eating These Waffles
Sweet Potato Waffles

“Wild Honey Pie” is Sweet and Simple, Just Like This Pie!
Date-Nut Fruit Pie

Here’s What They’re Serving in the “Octopus’s Garden”
Garden Stuffed Pitas

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