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The Physicians Committee



New Toxicology Society Seeks to Promote Nonanimal Methods for Chemical Testing

Nonanimal toxicological testing methods

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The American Society for Cellular and Computational Toxicology is dedicated to reducing and replacing animal use in toxicology for a more human-relevant—and humane—science.

The American Society for Cellular and Computational Toxicology (ASCCT) provides a forum for discussion of cellular (in vitro) and computational toxicology approaches, especially as replacements for animal-based toxicology methods. Through its meetings and activities, the society will facilitate the development, acceptance, and routine use of cellular and computational methods through open dialog among industry, academic, advocacy, and regulatory scientists. Because industries often have differing levels of experience and commitment to nonanimal toxicology approaches, ASCCT will also strengthen cooperation between cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and chemical industry scientists and professionals.

“This is the first scientific society in North America devoted to promoting the development and use of nonanimal toxicological testing methods,” says PCRM toxicologist and ASCCT secretary of the board Kristie Sullivan, M.P.H. “ASCCT’s formation was spurred by factors as diverse as concern for the animals used in tests, logistical difficulties in assessing growing inventories of substances, and the need for a better understanding of the interaction between chemistry and human biology at the molecular level.”

ASCCT’s board of directors has identified the support of young scientists interested in in vitro or computational toxicology research as one of its key goals and plans to provide travel awards to increase participation in conferences where new toxicology testing methods are presented.

During a presentation by ASCCT’s board of directors at the 2010 In Vitro Alternatives Forum, the society announced that it would begin accepting members. PCRM was one of the sponsors of the conference, which focused on upcoming toxicity testing challenges and the current activities designed to meet them.

ASCCT offers memberships for students, individuals, and organizations. All members receive:

  • A quarterly e-newsletter
  • A discounted subscription to the journal ALTEX
  • Discounted registration for ASCCT events
  • News and event updates on the in vitro and computational toxicology field
  • The chance to network with regulators, scientists, and policymakers on the cutting edge of nonanimal toxicology

Organizations that contribute by Aug. 31, 2011, will be considered founding sponsors and will receive one lifetime complimentary individual membership, display of their logo on the ASCCT website, and other advertising benefits over the life of the society.

To learn more about ASCCT and become a member, visit ASCCTox.org.




PCRM Online, November 2010

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