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News Release - animals in education

Live Animal Use at University of Tennessee College of Medicine Violates Federal Law

The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, a national nonprofit of 12,000 physicians, is calling on the University of Tennessee College of Medicine Chattanooga (UTCOM Chattanooga) to modernize its medical training methods and do away with live animal use.

Cleveland Clinic Ends Involvement in Live Dog Training Lab

Cleveland Clinic announced that it will end its involvement with a program that used live dogs for emergency medicine resident training and took place at Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED).

Doctors Pressure Mizzou to End Live Animal Use for Medical Training

The University of Missouri Columbia School of Medicine is violating federal law by using live animals in its emergency medicine training program.

Baystate Medical Center Animal Use Sparks Doctor-Led Demonstration

SPRINGFIELD, MASS.—On June 29, area physician Margaret Peppercorn and Massachusetts residents will be on site at Baystate Medical Center to call for an end to the use of live pigs in Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) courses—and a switch to human-relevant methods. The Physicians Committee, a nonprofit representing more than 12,000 concerned physicians, is organizing the event. The group will also file a federal complaint with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Eastern Region Animal Care office, citing inadequate oversight of the training protocol.

Billboards Call Out Hennepin County Medical Center for Live Animal Use

On Jun. 5, the Physicians Committee, a nonprofit representing more than 12,000 concerned physicians, will install two billboards near Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC), opposing the institution’s use of live rabbits and sheep to practice emergency medical procedures.

USDA Finds Animal Welfare Act Violations at Dartmouth

Following a complaint filed by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine on Mar. 2, 2017, an Apr. 19-20 inspection by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Eastern Region Animal Care office revealed inadequate oversight of animal training protocols by Dartmouth College’s Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC).

Doctors’ Group Petitions Québec Government to Halt Laval University’s Use of Live Piglets

The Physicians Committee, a nonprofit of 12,000 concerned physicians, is filing a petition with provincial ministers, against Laval University, regarding its use of live piglets for pediatrics training.

Doctors Group Protests Use of Animals at North Dakota State University, Offers to Pay for Modern Training Method

On Apr. 6, physicians Matthew Clayton and Marjorie Cramer will lead Fargo-area residents in a demonstration at North Dakota State University (NDSU) calling for an end to the use of live pigs in Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) training.

University of North Carolina Ends Use of Live Animals for Emergency Medicine Training

On Jan. 31, the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill announced that it will cease the use of live animals in its emergency medicine training program, according to an e-mail sent to the Physicians Committee. The university’s program joins the vast majority of emergency medicine residency programs in the United States in using human-based methods, such as medical simulation, to train residents. The announcement follows months of pressure from the Physicians Committee and comes on the heels of a similar decision by the University of South Carolina in September.

Physicians Committee Statement on Montgomery County Hospital District’s Termination of Live Animal Use for Paramedic Training

Officials at Montgomery County Hospital District (MCHD) have announced an end to the use of live animals in its paramedic training program.

Baylor Violating Federal Law by Using Live Animals

HOUSTON—Baylor College of Medicine in Houston is operating in violation of federal law by using live animals to teach paramedics from the Montgomery County Hospital District, according to a complaint that will be filed by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine—a national nonprofit of 12,000 concerned physicians—on Jan. 12, 2017.

Statement from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine on Morristown Medical Center Eliminating the Use of Animals for Emergency Medicine Training

On Nov. 17, officials at Morristown Medical Center announced that they are immediately ending the use of live dogs in their emergency medicine program. The announcement follows a public campaign by the Physicians Committee aimed at ending the practice, and we congratulate the hospital’s leadership for making this scientifically and ethically sound decision.

Ads Expose Use of Live Dogs for Emergency Medicine Training at Morristown Medical Center

MORRISTOWN, N.J.—Two train station ads and a billboard reveal Morristown Medical Center’s use of live dogs for medical training. The Physicians Committee—a nonprofit representing more than 12,000 concerned physicians—sponsored the ads.

A billboard located just north of Exit 13 on I-95, near Newark Liberty International Airport, states: “Morristown Medical Center: Don’t kill man’s best friend for medical training. NewJerseyDeservesBetter.org.” There are also two NJ Transit train platform ads with a similar message at the Morristown station.

Physicians Committee Commends Washington University for Ending Animal Labs

ST. LOUIS—Washington University has ended the use of live cats and ferrets in its pediatrics program, as announced in an e-mail to the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. The Physicians Committee—a national nonprofit of 12,000 concerned physicians—applauds the university’s decision to join all other surveyed programs in the United States in using human-relevant training methods, like advanced medical simulators.

Doctors Protest Hennepin County Medical Center’s Use of Animals

MINNEAPOLIS—On Sept. 29, doctors and Minneapolis-area residents will be on site at Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) to call for an end to the use of live rabbits and sheep in emergency medicine training and a switch to human-relevant methods. The Physicians Committee—the nonprofit representing more than 12,000 concerned physicians—is sponsoring the event. Demonstrators will carry signs and banners reading “Modernize Medical Training” and “End Animal Labs.”

University of South Carolina Emergency Medicine Program Ends Live Animal Use

COLUMBIA, S.C.—The University of South Carolina (USC) School of Medicine in Columbia has ended the use of live animals in its emergency medicine program, as announced in an e-mail to the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine on Sept. 20. The Physicians Committee—a national nonprofit of 12,000 concerned physicians—filed a federal complaint about the animal use on Aug. 25, 2016.

University of South Carolina’s Use of Live Animals Violates Federal Law

Physicians File Complaint Regarding Live Animal Use

University of North Carolina Violating Federal Law by Using Live Animals in Medical Training

Doctors Urge UNC to Halt Use of Animals in Emergency Medicine Training Program; Majority of Other Programs Use Human-Based Simulators

Statement from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine on End of Animal Labs in Medical Student Education

"A change 30 years in the making, animals are now belatedly but rightly absent from the process of educating medical students. The last training program in the United States and Canada to use animals in its curriculum has announced its elimination of the misguided practice. The decision by the University of Tennessee’s College of Medicine in Chattanooga ushers in a new era of medical education; students earning their M.D. or D.O. degrees will no longer be asked to use animals in the study of human medicine.
 

Physicians Committee Praises Johns Hopkins University’s Decision to End Animal Use in Medical Education

BALTIMORE—The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine—the nonprofit representing more than 12,000 physicians—applauds Johns Hopkins University’s decision to end the use of animals in its medical education training labs. Previously, medical students at Johns Hopkins practiced surgical techniques on live pigs.

Statement from the Physicians Committee on Johns Hopkins University Eliminating the Use of Animals in Medical Training

It is a tremendous relief to hear that Johns Hopkins University will finally begin using up-to-date, human-relevant methods to teach human medicine. This change will align Johns Hopkins’ medical education program with 99 percent of the country’s programs.

Live Demonstration of Medical Device TraumaMan to Accompany UW Board of Regents Meeting

SEATTLE—On Thursday, physicians and a paramedic will address the University of Washington’s Board of Regents meeting and testify against the school’s use of live animals in its paramedic training program to teach surgical airway. Immediately following the public comment period, a demonstration of the TraumaMan System human body simulator, which could replace the use of animals, will take place nearby.

Maryland Bill Will End Animal Use in Medical Education

WASHINGTON—On Thursday at 1 p.m., the Maryland House of Delegates will hold a hearing on House Bill 289, which would end animal use in medical education and training.

Billboard Confronts Wayne State Over Experiments on Dog Named Madonna

DETROIT—A hard-hitting billboard that has gone up near Wayne State University highlights the fate of a dog named Madonna who died in a Wayne State laboratory in August 2014. Sponsored by Physicians Committee—a nonprofit of 12,000 doctors--the billboard is timed to get the attention of the members of the Wayne State Board of Governors who are meeting on Sept. 25.

Michigan Physicians Take Action

More than 200 Michigan Physicians have signed petitions to Wayne State University asking for an end to heart failure experiments on dogs.

Doctor-Led Protest and Celebrity Statement Target Wayne State Dog Experiments

DETROIT-On April 8, local doctors, dogs, and concerned citizens will hold a peaceful demonstration at Wayne State University to protest the use of dogs in painful heart failure experiments. Legendary, Detroit-born comedian Lily Tomlin, a Wayne State alumna, is denouncing the dead-end dog experiments. Her statement will be hand delivered by doctors and protesters to Wayne State's president, M. Roy Wilson, M.D.

Congress Introduces Bipartisan Bill to Expand Nutrition Education and Physical Activity in U.S. Medical Schools

WASHINGTON-Today, Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, and Rep. Pat Tiberi, R-Ohio, introduced the Expanding Nutrition's Role in Curricula and Healthcare (ENRICH) Act. The bill proposes a $15 million competitive grant to expand nutrition and physical activity education programs to at least 30 U.S. medical schools.