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BREAKING MEDICAL NEWS June 23, 2005

Milk-Drinking Associated with Insulin Resistance and the Metabolic Syndrome

June 23, 2005

A new study links milk drinking with insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. The British Women's Heart and Health Study examined 4,024 British women aged 60-79. The metabolic syndrome was defined as including diabetes or prediabetic states, along with at least two of the following: obesity, hypertension, and lipid disorders (high triglycerides, low HDL). Those who avoided milk were about half as likely to have the metabolic syndrome, compared to milk drinkers: The age-adjusted odds ratio for the metabolic syndrome was 0.55 (95% CI, 0.33 – 0.94).

The researchers conclude that individuals who do not drink milk may be protected against insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome, but note that controlled trials are required to establish cause and effect.

Lawlor DA, Ebrahim S, Timpson N, Davey Smith G. Avoiding milk is associated with a reduced risk of insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome: findings from the British Women's Heart and Health Study. Diabet Med. 2005;22:808-811.

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