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BREAKING MEDICAL NEWS November 4, 2014

Low-Carb Diets Increase Risk of Death for Heart Patients

November 4, 2014

low carb diet and heart disease

A low-carbohydrate diet high in animal products is associated with an increased risk for dying, according to a new study published by the American Heart Association. Researchers analyzed the diets of 4,098 women and men who had previously had heart attacks and found they were 33 percent more likely to die from any cause and 51 percent more likely to die from heart disease if following a low-carbohydrate diet high in animal sources of protein and fat, compared with those whose dietary patterns consisted of fewer low-carb, animal-based products.

A previous publication following this same population showed that a diet lowest in red and processed meat products and sugar and highest in whole grains, fruits, and vegetables lowered the risk of death from heart disease by 40 percent, compared with no dietary changes.

Li S, Flint A, Pai JK, et al. Low carbohydrate diet from plant or animal sources and mortality among myocardial infarction survivors. J Am Heart Assoc. 2014;3:e001169.

 

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