Fiber Extends Life After a Heart Attack

The Physicians Committee

Fiber Extends Life After a Heart Attack

May 1, 2014

Fiber decreases the likelihood of dying after a heart attack, according to a recently published study in British Medical Journal.

A high-fiber diet was associated with a 31 percent reduction in dying from any cause and a 35 percent reduction in death from heart disease among 4,098 heart attack survivors from the Health Professionals Study and the Nurses’ Health Study.

Fiber, especially fiber from grains, decreases systemic inflammation, lowers bad cholesterol, improves insulin sensitivity, and enhances healthy gut flora. High-fiber foods are also high in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and phytochemicals — all nutrients that are beneficial to health. 

Li S, Flint A, Pai JK, et al. Dietary fiber intake and mortality among survivors of myocardial infarction: prospective cohort study. BMJ. 2014;348:2659-2671.

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