A Healthy Gut Reduces Diabetes Risk

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BREAKING MEDICAL NEWS November 17, 2016

A Healthy Gut Reduces Diabetes Risk

November 17, 2016

Eating patterns high in fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains can enhance the health of microbiota (gut bacteria), according to an article published in Diabetes Spectrum. Western diets high in fatty meats and low in fiber have a negative effect on gut bacterial health, increasing inflammation, obesity, and diabetes risk. To improve gut health, consume plant-based food sources of prebiotics, probiotics, and 25 to 38 grams of fiber per day. Prebiotics including leeks, asparagus, garlic, onions, whole wheat, oats, soybeans, and bananas, and probiotic sources include tempeh, miso, and water kefir.

Jardine M. Nutrition considerations for microbiota health in diabetes. Diabetes Spectr. 2016;29:238-244.

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