DONATE
FOR PHYSICIANS
HEALTH AND NUTRITION
ETHICAL RESEARCH & EDUCATION
MEDIA CENTER
LEGISLATIVE FOCUS
CLINICAL RESEARCH
EDUCATIONAL LITERATURE
MEMBERSHIP
SHOP

Connect with Us

 

 

The Physicians Committee



Resources for Physicians in Training

Clinical Research: Notable PCRM Publications

Diabetes Study
This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health. Individuals with type 2 diabetes (n=99) were randomly assigned to a low-fat plant-based diet (n=49) or a diet following the American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines (n=50). Participants were evaluated at baseline and 22 weeks. Both a low-fat plant-based diet and a diet based on ADA guidelines improved glycemic and lipid control in type 2 diabetic patients. These improvements were greater with a low-fat plant-based diet. PDF >

Menstrual Pain Study
In a crossover design, 33 women followed a low-fat, vegetarian diet for two menstrual cycles. For two additional cycles, they followed their customary diet while taking a supplement placebo pill. Dietary intake, serum sex-hormone binding globulin concentration, body weight, pain duration and intensity, and premenstrual symptoms were assessed during each study phase. A low-fat vegetarian diet was associated with increased serum sex-hormone binding globulin concentration and reductions in body weight, dysmenorrhea duration and intensity, and premenstrual symptom duration. PDF >

Weight Control Study
In an outpatient setting, 64 overweight, postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to a low-fat, plant-based diet or a control diet based on National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines, without energy intake limits, and were asked to maintain exercise unchanged. Dietary intake, body weight and composition, resting metabolic rate, thermic effect of food, and insulin sensitivity were measured at baseline and 14 weeks. Adoption of a low-fat, plant-based diet was associated with significant weight loss in overweight postmenopausal women, despite the absence of prescribed limits on portion size or energy intake. PDF >

GEICO I Study
At two corporate sites of the Government Employees Insurance Company (GEICO), employees who were either overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) and/or had type 2 diabetes participated in a 22-week, worksite-based dietary intervention study. At the intervention site, participants were asked to follow a low-fat, plant-based diet and participate in weekly group meetings that included instruction and group support. At the control site, participants received no instruction and made no diet changes.

A Multicomponent Intervention Reduces Body Weight and Cardiovascular Risk at a GEICO Corporate Site
Participants following a low-fat plant-based diet experienced significantly greater weight and waist circumference changes at 22 weeks compared with control-group participants. PDF >

A Worksite Programme Significantly Alters Nutrient Intakes
Participants following a low-fat, plant-based diet increased intake of protective nutrients, such as fiber, folate, and vitamin C, and decreases intakes of total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol. PDF >

A Worksite Plant-Based Nutrition Program Is Well-Accepted and Improves Health-Related Quality of Life and Work Productivity
Participants following a low-fat plant-based diet experienced improvement in both physical and mental health, quality of life, and work productivity. A low-fat plant-based diet is well-accepted and can be implemented by employers to improve employee health. PDF >

GEICO II Study
In our second GEICO study, 292 GEICO employees in 10 sites across the country who were either overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) and/or had type 2 diabetes participated in an 18-week worksite-based dietary intervention study. At the intervention site, participants were asked to follow a low-fat plant-based diet and participate in weekly group meetings that included instruction and group support (intervention group). At the control site, participants received no instruction and made no diet changes (control group). Weight, serum lipid concentration and glycemic control were measured at baseline and 18 weeks. Three papers from this study are currently pending publication.

This site does not provide medical or legal advice. This Web site is for informational purposes only.
Full Disclaimer | Privacy Policy

The Physicians Committee
5100 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Ste.400, Washington DC, 20016
Phone: 202-686-2210     Email: pcrm@pcrm.org