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The Physicians Committee



Top Ten U.S. Medical Schools Abandon Animal Labs: Others Abandon Change

When Duke University School of Medicine dropped animal laboratories from its physiology curriculum this year, it signaled a profound victory in the fight for higher ethical standards in medical education. With Duke on board, not one of the top ten medical colleges in the United States uses animals to train tomorrow's doctors. Overall, 91 of the country's 126 medical schools now have entirely nonanimal curricula. At the same time, schools such as Case Western Reserve University and New York Medical College cling to the practice of using animals despite student objections and the availability of superior methods of study.

For years, PCRM has provided medical students with literature, videotapes, and on-site lectures about state-of-the-art techniques used to teach everything from physiology and pharmacology to surgical procedures. Invariably, student response is overwhelming. Many are eager to stay abreast of modern techniques, many are ethically opposed to killing animals. All are curious, thoughtful, and interested. Unfortunately, some medical school administrators stifle even a discussion about alternatives to animal labs. One student, who arranged to have PCRM's Murry Cohen, M.D., talk to her first-year classmates, was informed that "outside groups" are not invited to speak on this "sensitive subject," even though other medical topics are commonly addressed by outside speakers. Similarly, a lecture at New York Medical College by PCRM's Sam Jacobs, M.D., was canceled by administrators fearful of controversy over the school's remaining animal labs.

Cruelty-Free Education: More Medical Schools Make the List

  • Boston University School of Medicine
  • Duke University School of Medicine
  • Indiana University School of Medicine
  • University of Alabama School of Medicine


 

Summer 2001 (Volume X, Number 3)
Summer 2001
Volume X
Number 3

Good Medicine
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